St. Paul’s Tervuren at 30

At Christmastime 1988, the Reverend Stephen Seamer was sent out by Holy Trinity Brussels to plant a church in the suburb of Tervuren, east of Brussels city. The venue was carefully researched, a team of church planters was assembled, the local population was leafleted, the opening carol service was advertised, and the doors were opened. But nobody could have dared to believe that there would be 400 people in the congregation. The church was packed to capacity, there were people crouching in the doorways and even gathering outside in the churchyard. Stephen Seamer described it as a miracle, and it is said that he was reduced to tears. St. Paul’s English-speaking church was born. And seldom has a new church begun in such a dramatic way.

Stephen ministered at St. Paul’s for 10 years and under his leadership St. Paul’s became an independent chaplaincy in 1993. He was followed by Stuart Robinson. Stuart was a charismatic leader who stayed just three years before being made Bishop of Canberra. Stuart was succeeded by Hugh Cox, a lovely, gentle and wise Australian who welcomed me to Brussels 13 years ago. In his turn, Hugh was succeeded by a third Australian, Chris Edwards, whose daughter fell in love with and married the Swedish intern working at Holy Trinity. So the Edwards family was divided between northern and southern hemispheres. And after that, Chris said to me, ‘Robert, make sure St. Paul’s doesn’t appoint any more Australians!’ That advice was taken. And who could be more English than the current incumbent Simon Tyndall, distant descendant of the William Tyndale who produced most of our English King James Bible.

30 years after its foundation, St Paul’s remains a thriving church – perhaps a slightly older community, with longer stayers, more national diversity and a much wider geographical catchment area. And it was a great personal pleasure for me to celebrate the past history and present life of St. Paul’s on its 30th birthday.

The present faith of St. Paul’s is embodied in the 8 candidates I had the honour of confirming: Hannah, Anna, Tanya, Nita, Emma, Emma, Rutger and Benjamin.

One church member who can trace the whole of the 30 years of St. Paul’s history is Patrick Lambert. He goes back to the second Sunday of St. Paul’s existence. Patrick is a retired senior member of staff of the European Commission and a much respected elder statesman of the community. It was a joy for me to licence Patrick as a Reader and to commission him for the work of teaching, preaching and pastoral care.

A 30th birthday is the opportunity to invite back old friends. The Revd. Sarah Williams had a wonderful ministry with children over many years in Tervuren as well as on ICS Chaplains and Families conferences. She left Tervuren to become a vicar in Romney Marsh, in Kent. She is now retired and returned for the celebration with her husband Rocyn.

In the beginning, St. Paul’s met in the Roman Catholic church of St. Paul’s Vossem (hence the name). But it soon moved to the British School of Brussels, where the classrooms provide lots of space for the church’s extensive children’s ministry. After worship, the school cafeteria is quickly transformed from a chapel into a dining room. So we enjoyed a festive meal together.

I am thankful for this thriving, diverse and lively church community, and for its clergy Simon and Nathan. Advent is a season of hope, and there is much to hope for in the present and future of St. Paul’s Tervuren.

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